The InterLearn Blog

All posts in the Curriculum Design category

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The Truths We Ignore about Faculty (and how to embrace those Truths)

I’ve seen it time and again…examples of exceptional teachers in higher education and some dismal failures.  We look to faculty to be the deliverers of our message and mission to the students at our institutions.  We hire them educated in their field of study and ask them to pass on the body of knowledge to our students from our institutional perspective.  

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The Mindset of Online Curriculum Systems

The phrase of change is the new constant is one that is sometimes frustrating to embrace. This is a surviving mentality … we have to change to survive. Frankly though, survival is no longer good enough. Thriving is the important mindset to develop, which requires two things: saying goodbye to the old and embracing innovation. This isn’t a requirement to change the world though; rather, it’s a strategy to stay true to your vision and being flexible on how you achieve it.

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Creating Program Oriented Curriculum

Let’s make an assumption that you have achieved or have an intentional path towards the mindset of online curriculum in terms of systems thinking. You’ll notice in my post on The Mindset of Online Curriculum Systems that I have a focus on the value of scalable curriculum in order to meet the consumer demands of accelerated learning. To really serve the adult learner’s need for fast and relevant learning, adjunct facilitation because a crucial aspect to scaling success, and in that, curriculum must also be standardized.

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The Role of Centralization in Higher Education

There has been a push in elementary education across the grades to de-centralize curriculum development. However, there is a danger that the collegiate world of curriculum development knows all too well …. that decentralization is a breeding ground for silos. As noted in our post titled Prescribed Learning for Adults, there are extremes, and we have reaped the benefits with standardized tests on one extreme and a disorganized learning experience with no quantifiable feedback on the other extreme.